A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/FAC

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Iceman
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A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/FAC

Post by Iceman » Tue May 24, 2011 4:31 pm

An AWACS aircraft, in real life, is the all seeing eye of the battlefield - the unit's central command. The objective of the AWACS aircraft is to identify targets, relay important information and give warnings when necessary. However, a lot of newbies seem to be calling out AWACS and not really doing the job they're supposed to. So I give you a quick guide on how the CVW-171 FAC/AWACS communications are set up to give people interested in flying this particular mission type a look into how it's actually done.

1. Establish (and receive recognition) that you are the AWACS.
By the way, to be AWACS doesn't mean you have to fly a big bulky airplane with a fat disc radar, but basically meaning that you're the flight lead and are in control of the current squadron/situation. Once you've stated that you're an AWACS, request a formation escort. The planes who are willing to escort you are yours - don't bark orders at people who aren't interested in flying AWACS with you.

2. Instruct your units to constantly report any change in their situation.
The "situation" defines the whole set of circumstances currently affecting the pilot. When one of your units has changed heading, changed speed or just changed anything in general, have them report to you and ALWAYS ANSWER BACK. A simple "Roger that, callsign" or "acknowledged, callsign" should suffice.

3. Always remember the whole situation.
Of course, you can't remember every little detail, but at least try to remember the things that are really important - that is what the reporting in is about. If Pilot A breaks off to attack a ground target to your left on your 10 at 635kts under 1000ft, just remember that Pilot A is entering a hostile situation on the left fast and low. And with this information in mind...

4. Constantly check for threats - especially after your pilots change positions or situations.
As a rule of thumb, I glance at the radar every single time one of my units report in to make sure there are no hostiles in their position. If I can't locate them, I ask them to look around and report anything hostile. But remember: you must be fast checking for threats, because if you take 30 seconds each time someone reports in, in those 30 seconds they can get killed from a previously undetected threat.

5. Brevity codes aren't made just to be cool.
Yes, brevity codes are awesome when used correctly. Yes, you and your friends sound like badass fighter jocks when you scream "Fox Two" after shooting off a missile. But knowing brevity codes and usage also helps with communication speed. And as Sun Tzu said, the force with greater speed is always the victor.

6. Command the battlefield - don't just guard your friends.
As AWACS, since you don't need to worry about fighting you can just command the battlefield - and having a legit AWACS commanding the battlefield can be efficient and rewarding as all hell. Split up your units! Tell one to fly left and one to fly right. Have them flank a target! Let one protect you while the other two intercept, then move down the ground targets with one unit to the left and one unit to the right...etc. the Choice is yours. But that kind of precision is rarely seen without someone flying an AWACS.

Common brevity Codes:

TAKEOFF:
"Rolling" - Aircraft has began takeoff procedures. (Mauler 1, rolling)
"away" - aircraft has lifted off the ground. (Mauler 1, away)

LANDING:
"on approach" - aircraft is starting initial approach on runway. (Mauler 1, on approach runway 08R)
"on final" - aircraft is starting final approach to runway. (Mauler 1, on final runway 08R)
"touchdown" - aircraft has touched down and is rolling on the runway. (Mauler 1, touchdown!)
"ball" - Used when an aircraft is next in line and aligned with a carrier deck. (Mauler 1, ball) (Mauler 1, I have the ball)
"coming around" - Used when an aircraft misses a landing and needs to circle around to land again. (Mauler 1 coming around.)

ENGAGING:
"Fox 1" - A-AAM Fire.
"Fox 2" - AAM Fire.
"Fox 3" - AIM-120 Fire.
"Rifle" - AGM fire.
"Nails" - Rockets fire.
"Bombs Off" - Bombs away.
"Pickle" - Bombs away.
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Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by Welshy » Tue May 24, 2011 4:57 pm

Amazing Ice....

I find that being in the right position also helps as you want to be able to see as much as possible and also putting the planes autopilot to circle helps :P

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Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by Phoenix » Tue May 24, 2011 5:14 pm

Roger that.

Shutter

Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by Shutter » Tue May 24, 2011 9:27 pm

http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/servic ... revity.pdf
for more brevity codes

of interest are (and in some way relevant to ys imo)
angels (alitude in thousands of feet)

bandit (aircraft indentified as enemy, does not imply direction or authority to engage)

beaming x (where x is direction in which the target is stabilized from 70 to 110 degrees given with cardinal direction (east, west, north, south)

bingo (just enough fuel to get home, or am going to specified refueling point)

bird (friendly sam)

Birds away (friendly sams lauched at enemies)

Blind (no visual)

bogey (unidentified radar or visual contact)

break x (where x is direction. Perform immediate max turn in indicated direction and assume defensive position)

Broke lock (loss of radar or infrared lock-on)

buddy locked (locked to a known friendly aircraft)

bugout x (where x is direction, basically retreat with no intent of reengagement)

buster (fly at max continuous speed [military power])

cease fire (do not open fire or cease firing)

check (turn x degrees left or right and maintain new heading)

cherubs (height in hundreds of feet)

chicks (friendly aircraft)

cleared hot (ordnance release authorized)

closing (decreasing in range)

committed (fighter intent to engage or intercept; controller continues to provide info)

confetti (chaff lane or corridor)

cons/conning (threat/bogey aircraft leaving contrails)

contact (sensor contact at stated position, acknowledges sighting at specified point)

cutoff (request for, or directive to use cutoff geometry to intercept)

defensive x (where x is spike/missile/sam/mud/aaa and aircraft is maneuvering with reference to stated condition)

deploy (directive to go to briefed position)

engaged (maneuvering with intent to kill)

extend (short term maneuver to gain energy, distance or separation with probable intent of reengaging)

faded (radar contact lost)

feet wet/dry (flying over water/land)

furball (large fight with friendlies and bandits)

gorilla (large force of indeterminate formation and numbers)

hard x (where x is direction, sustained high g turn)

heads up (alert of activity of interest)

heavy (three or more in a group or package)

home plate (home airfield or carrier)

joker (not at bingo yet but point at which bugout/separation/termination should take place)

kill (clearance to fire)

lights on/off (directive to turn lights on or off)

mother (parent ship)

mud x (where x is type and direction. RWR threat followed by type and clock direction)

no factor (not a threat)

no joy (no visual contact with bandit/target/landmark)

package (isolated collection of groups/contacts/formation)

playmate (cooperating aircraft)

popeye (flying in clouds or area of reduced visibility)

post hole (rapidly descending spiral)

ripple (two or more munitions fired at close intervals)

saunter (fly at best endurance)

shadow (follow indicated aircraft)

tally (sighting of target)

tiger (enough fuel and ordnance to accept a commit)

trashed (missile is defeated)

winchester (no ordnance remaining)

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Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by skyller2s » Wed May 25, 2011 2:36 am

well it's about Damn time somebody told these newbies what the duty of an AWACS is.
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Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by Shiny Rice » Wed May 25, 2011 2:04 pm

There really should be a type of planes in YSflight that are AWACS with extended radar range. This guide will be very useful for my squadron. Thanks Iceman.
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Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by Phoenix » Wed May 25, 2011 2:06 pm

NB: we were trying to start up a squadron but t went nowhere.

please, I get it was a bad idea so no need to say so.

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Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by vandal » Wed May 25, 2011 5:26 pm

Guns Guns : Call this when you have used up all weapons and only have guns left or when using guns to kill something.

Rolling in : Call this when you are abut to dice for a ground attack.

Splash # : Call this followed by a number to confirm an Air-to-Air. So the first person you shoot down would be "Splash One" then when you shoot down another you call "Splash Two" and then "Splash Three" and so on.
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Re: A Short Guide On How To (really, actually) be an AWACS/F

Post by skyller2s » Fri May 27, 2011 3:01 am

general rule of thumb when flying AWACS
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